Favorite FoodieBooks Friday! No Knead Olive Skillet Bread

No Knead Olive Skillet Bread

This FoodieBook Friday is a revisit to last weeks Pecan & Cherry Stuffed Squash post. I’ve had several requests to post the full No Knead Olive Skillet Bread recipe. It’s an amazingly moist, easy to make, garlicky, yeasty, salty, olivey treat!

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This bread is reminiscent of focaccia bread. It’s chewy and kind of like a thick pizza dough. Next time, I might try substituting olives with roasted peppers, tomatoes, eggplant and garlic!

I adapted it slightly by increasing the flour to four cups, adding more delicious olives and a tad less garlic and salt.

No Knead Olive Skillet Bread

This crusty, garlicky, yeasty olive bread is super easy and ready to eat in about 2 1/2 hours!
Prep Time2 hrs 40 mins
Total Time2 hrs 35 mins
Course: Appetizer, bread, Breakfast, Side Dish, Snack
Cuisine: American, Italian, Mediterranean
Servings: 12
Calories: 177kcal
Author: ebookfoodie

Ingredients

  • 2 cup water Luke warm
  • 2 1/4 tsp active dry yeast (one packet)
  • 1 1/2 tsp salt I used pink himalayan.
  • 4 cups flour
  • 1/2 tbsp granulated garlic (Lawrey's Granulated Garlic with Parsley is the best!) Make it a hefty 1/2 tablespoon.
  • 1 tsp dried basil
  • 1 tsp dried parsley
  • 1 tsp thyme leaves I used fresh thyme.
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 1/4 cup pitted, sliced olives Sliced brined olives such as an Italian olive mix, and/or Kalamata olives.

Instructions

  • Add 2 cups lukewarm water to a large mixing bowl.
  • Add the yeast packet, or 2 1/4 tsp of yeast, and stir well.
  • Add 1 cup flour and the salt and stir well.
  • Add the garlic powder and sliced olives and stir. (Save a few pretty slices to garnish the top before baking) Feel free to add some herbs, like a tbsp of fresh oregano or chopped rosemary.
  • Add another cup of flour and stir.
  • One at a time, add the remaining two cups of flour, stirring well between each addition.
  • Cover with plastic wrap and place a tea towel over it. Place it somewhere warm to rest and rise for 1 hour.
    Olive skillet bread, covered to rise
  • After the dough has rested an hour, oil the bottom and sides of a 10” cast iron skillet with 1/2 tbsp olive oil.
  • Pour the dough into the skillet using your fingers to pull it out of the bottom of the bowl. It will be sticky!
  • Lightly oil your fingers and press the dough around gently to even it out.
    Olive bread rising in cast iron skillet
  • Preheat your oven to 425° F.
  • Cover skillet loosely with plastic wrap. Let it proof (or rise) for an additional 30 minutes. I spread some olive oil on the wrap to keep it from sticking to the top of the dough,
  • Sprinkle the top with the herbs, and add some pretty olive slices if you want to make it pretty! (A drizzle of olive oil and some flaky sea salt sprinkled on the top looks lovely too!)
    Olive Skillet Bread, after second rise
  • Bake for 30 minutes and check to see if it's golden brown on top. If not, give it a few more minutes until it's golden brown.
  • Remove skillet from the oven and place on a large, heavy rack or trivet to cool down enough to remove from the pan.
  • After several minutes, place a large plate over the top of the bread. Using potholders, place one hand on top of the plate, and use the other hand to flip it upside down so it's upside down on top of the plate. Now place a cookie rack on top of the bread and flip it upside down again and remove the plate.
  • Allow it to cool for at least a half of an hour. Try and give it time to cool to room temperature before cutting into it. If you cut into it too soon, the steam will release and you will end up with a dry loaf, and it'll be gummy when you try and cut it.

Notes

  • I’ve supplemented with plain black olives. As long as you have some salty olives, the bread will turn out fabulous!
  • When I first made this bread, I wasn’t sure how much flour to use, so I used about 3 1/5 cups. It was very, very moist! I increased it to 4 cups of flour for a less fragile, slightly higher loaf.
  • I like to slice a large round of bread like this by cutting it in half once. Then cut the half into shorter slices.
  • I took it to a dinner at my Sister-in-laws and it served 8 easily with plenty of leftovers!
  • This makes amazing sandwiches if it makes it to leftovers.
  • I found this recipe on Food in Books blog and adapted it slightly. Food In Books Venessa blogs about, well, you guessed it, food in books, and posts the best book reviews along with beautiful photos as she cooks dishes inspired by her reading.
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